From Hindu Rashtra to Hindu Raj? A de facto or a de jure ethnic democracy? - Sciences Po Access content directly
Book Sections Year : 2022

From Hindu Rashtra to Hindu Raj? A de facto or a de jure ethnic democracy?

Abstract

India was long considered a fine example of liberal parliamentary democracy among countries of the South. In addition to a strong legislature and judiciary, as well as a vibrant free press, political pluralism was nourished by federalism and cultural diversity, both linguistic and religious. It is the erosion – even the obliteration – of the country’s religious diversity that this chapter describes. This evolution calls into question India’s secularism, a system for managing relations between state and religion that differs from what is known as laïcité in France, for instance. While in France the state is supposed to have no connection with religion, in India, the republic’s institutions acknowledge that religion has a perfectly legitimate place in the public sphere. What secularism and laïcité have in common, however, is the rejection of the dominance of any one religion in that sphere.
Fichier principal
Vignette du fichier
2022_jaffrelot_chapter_handbook_autocratization_south-asia.pdf (721.81 Ko) Télécharger le fichier
Origin : Publisher files allowed on an open archive

Dates and versions

hal-03885414 , version 1 (05-12-2022)

Licence

Attribution - NonCommercial - NoDerivatives

Identifiers

Cite

Christophe Jaffrelot. From Hindu Rashtra to Hindu Raj? A de facto or a de jure ethnic democracy?. Sten Widmalm (ed.). Routledge Handbook of Autocratization in South Asia, Routledge, pp.127-138, 2022, 9781000486605. ⟨10.4324/9781003042211-13⟩. ⟨hal-03885414⟩
48 View
560 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Facebook X LinkedIn More