The LongTerm Effects of the Printing Press in SubSaharan Africa - Sciences Po Access content directly
Preprints, Working Papers, ... Year : 2014

The LongTerm Effects of the Printing Press in SubSaharan Africa

Julia Cage
Valeria Rueda

Abstract

This article delves into the relationship between newspaper readership and civic attitudes, and its effect on economic development. To this end, we investigate the long-term consequences of the introduction of the printing press in the 19th century. In sub-Saharan Africa, Protestant missionaries were the first both to import the printing press technology and to allow the indigenous population to use it. We build a new geocoded dataset locating Protestant missions in 1903. This dataset includes, for each mission station, the geographic location and its characteristics, as well as the educational and health-related investments undertaken by the mission. We show that, within regions located close to missions, proximity to a printing press significantly increases newspaper readership today. We also document a strong association between proximity to a printing press and contemporary economic development. Our results are robust to a variety of identification strategies.
Fichier principal
Vignette du fichier
2014-15.pdf (901.57 Ko) Télécharger le fichier
Origin : Files produced by the author(s)
Loading...

Dates and versions

hal-01071879 , version 1 (06-10-2014)

Licence

Attribution - NoDerivatives

Identifiers

Cite

Julia Cage, Valeria Rueda. The LongTerm Effects of the Printing Press in SubSaharan Africa. 2014. ⟨hal-01071879⟩
166 View
854 Download

Share

Gmail Facebook X LinkedIn More